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5 Newborn Myths Debunked

mom meeting baby for the first time

mom meeting baby for the first time

Even when she's not louder than a fire truck, your newborn can inspire plenty of worries about her health and well-being. For example, there's that question of should you nurse on demand at the risk of your milk supply. You can rest a little easier because this is one of five common myths about newborns that just aren't true.

Need to Nurse

Lisa Marasco of the La Leche League International refutes the idea that on-demand nursing is bad. She writes that it can actually optimize the mother's milk supply. The site says a mother who breastfeeds an average of 9.9 times a day in the first two weeks will have plenty of milk production. In fact, the site says the milk supply goes down when the feedings aren't frequent.

Educational Sights

Some parents believe exposing a newborn to things like educational videos will subconsciously boost the child's brain power. You're better off letting the child grow a few months, if not years, before it will do any good. Doctor Natasha Kasbekar on the Kids Health Partners website writes that the baby can't possibly relate all of those images to anything he'll apply in the real world. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests no TV at all until the baby turns 2.

RELATED: 7 Lies About Babies and Sleep

Smile Style

Wave off the comment "It's just gas" when your newborn grins. According to the AAP, infants start experimenting with basic smiles in their first few months. By the second month, a baby can smile in a social way when he's feeling contentment or pleasure.

Bath Time

Even though cleanliness is important, the idea that a newborn needs a daily bath is nothing more than a myth. A baby needs a full-on bath two to three times per week, according to "Fit Pregnancy" magazine. Soap can quickly dry on delicate skin. Just use a warm, wet cloth to cleanse her diaper area, skin creases and neck in between baths.

Baby's Brain

Even though the baby's soft spot, or fontanel, may seem like it makes his brain vulnerable, it doesn't. While you shouldn't poke it, doctor Andrew Adesman, Schneider Children's Hospital's chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics, tells "Fit Pregnancy" magazine the brain is well protected even when the fontanel isn't fully closed.

RELATED: Wackiest Parenting Myths

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