Join Club Momme for exclusive access to giveaways, discounts and more!

Sign up

Don't Blame Disney, Blame Anti-Vaxxers

Photograph by Rex / Rex USA

What was I doing in mid-December? I was at Disneyland. What happened at Disneyland during mid-December? A highly contagious, airborne disease was apparently entering the lungs of crowds of people.

Now, nine Disneyland and Disney California Adventure visitors — from ages 8 months to 21 years — are suffering through a case of measles, a totally preventable disease.

Am I, a self-proclaimed germaphobe and hypochondriac, freaking out right now? No. You know why I’m not rushing my 8-year-old daughter to the hospital or checking out the symptoms of the measles on WebMD? Because my daughter and I (back in the day) have been vaccinated against the measles. We are safe.

RELATED: I'm a Vaccine-Wary Mom

Measles had been eliminated in 2000, after the vaccinations against the disease became commonplace. But now, thanks to those who are against vaccinations, measles is on the comeback trail. It should be noted that most of those who contracted measles at Disneyland had not been vaccinated. What's tragic is that two of them are too young for the vaccine.

First, I want to defend Disneyland, a place that I love. People are actually blaming the popular park—the happiest place on earth—for the outbreak. While Disney Parks make sure that there is safety in terms of their rides and crowd control, there is nothing they can do to stop the spread of germs. This outbreak could have happened at a county fair, your local zoo, or a museum — any place where people congregate.

Disneyland isn’t to blame: It’s the people who have opted themselves and their children out of vaccinations that are.

Bottom line: Don’t blame the house of the mouse, blame those who opt to not vaccinate.

OK, I know all those anti-vaxxers peeps are getting their panties in a bunch right now, thinking that vaccinations lead to autism, mind control—or whatever it is that they believe. But this measles outbreak could have been totally avoided.

The Los Angeles Times warned of the spread of measles (and whooping cough) in the U.S. in their piece, “The toll of the anti-vaccination movement, in one devastating graphic.”

“… [I]n the developed world it's an artifact of the anti-vaccination movement, which has associated the vaccine with autism. That connection, promoted by the discredited British physician Andrew Wakefield and the starlet Jenny McCarthy, has been thoroughly debunked. But its effects live on, as the map shows.” On this map, right in the Los Angeles area, is a purple dot showing the presence of measles.

Bottom line: Don’t blame the house of the mouse, blame those who opt to not vaccinate.

RELATED: Vaccinations Shouldn't Be Optional

Explore More: health, news, celebrities
More from entertainment