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The Plight of the Billionaire Moms

Photograph by Getty Images

Quick—someone break out a violin. A really, really big and really, really expensive violin. The world’s richest moms need it to accompany their very, very bittersweet (and very, very annoying) story.

Erin Carlyle writes in Forbes about how the world’s richest moms (and, inexplicably, Oprah) successfully combine being billionaires and parents.

Because “raising nice, normal kids can be quite the challenge for billionaires. So, too, can be keeping your relationship with your children intact. What, with the nannies, the media attention and the abundance of wealth itself, billionaire spawn can face more than the average temptations by the time they reach 18.”

Let’s not insult other women by pretending that something so basic, primal and important is as challenging when you have every possible bit of help at your disposal.

It’s not as if wealthy women necessarily live problem-free lives. But let’s not insult other women by pretending that something so basic, primal and important is as challenging when you have every possible bit of help at your disposal. If your priorities are straight, values are intact, integrity level is high, you don’t have a need to walk red carpets on weeknights, your kids aren’t given everything they ask for whenever they ask for it—chances are good that your family will do just fine (or at least as fine as non-billionaire families do). Especially if you can afford to have other people take care of all of the other clutter and stress that bogs down families afforded fewer choices.

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Go ahead and be a billionaire. Your goods and services clearly make people happy, and the money you spend goes into the health of the economy. You probably employ tons of people. Surely you give boatloads to charity. However, when you’re a billionaire and decide to remain at the helm of your company and also raise good kids, you are making a choice. While you may decide to call that choice a challenge, you might also just want to keep that to yourself next time.

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