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Natural Skincare Treatments

Honey

Honey has been used in for centuries. Recent scientific research suggests that wounds resistant to antibiotics may respond to honey. Research using sterile, medical-grade honey is being conducted by the Waikato Honey Research Unit in New Zealand. Honey's natural properties make it desirable as a skin treatment. It has components of a humectant, naturally hydrating skin. Applying honey as a mask after face-washing can help skin retain moisture.

Chamomile

Chamomile has been used for centuries as an herbal remedy. It is often used in baby products due to its calming properties. Chamomile can reduce puffiness and redness and soothe skin. Chamomile tea bags can be added to a running bath for a skin-refreshing soak. It can also be applied to eyes as a compress to soothe tired, puffy eyes.

Sea Salt

Exfoliation, the process of removing dead skin cells, is one of the steps to a proper skin care regimen. It can get at dirt and debris that a simple washing can't remove. Using products that are too rough can be detrimental to healthy skin. Sea salt is a natural exfoliating agent, as the granules roughen the skin surface without overly abrasive action.

Shea Butter

Dry skin is one of the warning signs of dehydration. Aside from drinking enough water and other fluids, you can also help by moisturizing your skin. Some women, though, have allergic reactions or sensitivities to the dyes and perfumes in commercial skin care products. Shea butter is natural hydrating compound. Its fatty acids provide lasting moisture that won't wash off like some commercial lotions. Shea butter can be used on razor-irritated skin, diaper rash, cracked heels and dry scalps. It contains vitamins A and E.

Green Tea

Green tea is added to a variety of commercial skin care products. Everything from moisturizers to lotions and shower gels tout its benefits. However, some of these products cause irritation and lack enough tea. Reap the benefits without subjecting the skin to artificial products -- try actual green tea. The August 2000 issue of "Archives of Dermatology" has research that suggests green tea has skin antioxidant properties.

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