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You Can't Name Your Baby 'Nutella'

A couple in the French city of Valenciennes named their child "Nutella" this past September but it shortly become a court issue after the couple tried to register the name with civil authorities.

According to a translation of the court documents on Time.com: "The name 'Nutella' given to the child is the trade name of a spread," the court's decision read, according to a translation. "And it is contrary to the child's interest to be wearing a name like that can only lead to teasing or disparaging thoughts."

This wouldn't be the first time a name was banned in France. Apparently another couple tried to register the name "Strawberry" but because of its negative connotation in the French language (it's part of a rude slang term), it too was banned.

Of course you'll remember the kerfuffle surrounding Gwyneth Paltrow and husband Chris Martin's name choice for their daughter, Apple. According to Paltrow, she named her daughter Apple, "because apples are whole, sweet and crisp."

Personally, I can't imagine a better name than Nutella. The hazelnut-chocolate spread is a divine dessert and goes well with everything from fruit and bread to cakes and pretzels. It pairs well with other nut-butters or simply as a stand-alone with a just a spoon. Oh wait, we're talking about a person's name, not the actual product.

Baby names have always caused controversy whether you are French, a celebrity or just trying to get by on your piece of land. My mother tells the story of naming her first born "Jennifer" back in 1968 and her mother-in-law saying, "Where'd you get a name like that?" Hard to imagine Jennifer being controversial but alas, the times are a'changing.

Here is a list of banned baby names across the globe just in case you have your baby in a foreign country and are set on a name like Chow Tow—yep, not allowed. It means "smelly head" in Malaysia.

Unfortunately, the French couple who wanted to name their daughter something "popular, sweet and homely—exactly how they wanted their children to turn out," have instead decided to register her name as "Ella." Not a bad compromise. Perhaps they'll nickname her "Nutty."

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