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Cost of Birth for Royal Baby Less Than Cost of Birth in US

Proving, yet again, that America is one of the costliest places in the world to give birth, Quartz has just uncovered that the hospital bill for Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge's (aka Kate Middleton) impending bundle of joy will be less than the cost of a hospital birth for an uninsured American.

The royal couple is expected to give birth at the same private facility that Prince George was born, the Lindo Wing. According to the facility's publicly posted prices, the most luxurious suite—which is where Will and Kate are presumed to stay—costs about $8000 a night for a vaginal birth and approximately $10,000 a night for a C-section. Doesn't sound exactly cheap, right? What you may not know is that the Lindo Wing, along with all other British hospitals, is a part of the UK National Health Service (NHS) which means that both mom and child receive free birthing services guaranteed by the organization and only pay for additional fees they rack up at the luxury facility.

That means that if Kate had decided to have her birth at a public hospital (as the great majority of British citizens do), she could've had a completely free birth. But even with choosing to give birth at a luxury facility, Will and Kate's hospital bill should only come out to approximately $18,000—this includes a 2-night stay and her the royal family doctor's consultation fee (she is a princess, after all)! In contrast to this, the average cost of birth in America is $32,000, almost double what the royal family will pay.

Imagine being slapped with a bill like that while you're recovering from giving birth and tending to the all-encompassing needs of a newborn—especially if you're uninsured and responsible for every single penny. And that's just your "standard" birth. If you want to go high-end and have a luxury suite at a private hospital, you can just imagine how much more the costs would be. Greedy hospitals or just poor public policy? Either way, we bet you're wishing you lived in the UK right about now!

Image via Getty Images

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