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This Mom Wants You to Know Pregnancy Is NOT an April Fool's Joke

Photograph by Kayla Lee Welch

Every year on April Fool's Day, people take to social media to post fake baby bumps and ultrasounds hoping to shock family members and friends into thinking they're pregnant. Here's the thing: It's a tired trope—and actually kind of offensive to some people. For Kayla Lee Welch and many women who have dealt with pregnancy loss and infertility, baby announcements are nothing to joke about.

catherinegiudici

17 weeks :)

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It's a girl ❤️💕❤️gx

Last year, the Alabama mom took to Facebook to ask people to think twice before posting a fake pregnancy April Fool's joke—a reminder that's once again being shared across social media this year.

"This is why your April fools joke isn't funny. This is why it's not funny to lie and joke about being pregnant. This is what it looks like to have a miscarriage," Welch wrote on Facebook, including photos of her pregnancy tests and the physical signs of grief. "Because what's funny for a second in your eyes crushes someone else's heart for eternity."

Photograph by Kayla Lee Welch
Photograph by Kayla Lee Welch

The mom, who started spotting a week before the post, honestly shared the pain she felt about losing a child. Whenever she would try to sleep, she would drown in her own thoughts.

"All I can do is cry. My eyes are so swollen and dark it looks like more than just my heart is broken. Crying so hard that you go numb and feel nothing anymore. Being so angry and upset at everything but not being able to explain why. Trying to be happy that your baby never knew anything other than love. And missing someone so dearly that you never even met," Welch wrote. "It's a pain no one can describe. Because how can you properly grieve someone you never got to meet?"

Photograph by Kayla Lee Welch

Last week, Welch posted an update that she's now in her third trimester. Though she is excited to meet her rainbow baby, she's also aware that the grief of losing a child never leaves you. She still remembers every detail of the day she lost her child a year ago.

"I fear every day of my pregnancy even at 32 weeks ... Every single time I've gone to the bathroom this pregnancy I brace myself for the blood. Every single damn time. It set in such a deep pain that I pray every night and every morning to just let him be OK," the mom revealed. "People don't understand you don't heal from this. No matter when you lost your child the pain never heals, and the people around you never know because opening up is so damn scary."

Though as many as 15 percent to 20 percent of women's pregnancies end in miscarriages, it's still a taboo topic and can discourage people from speaking up. But know that you are not alone.

Welch hopes more women open up about their emotions and experiences. Because if no one knows what you're feeling, how can they offer their support when you most need it?

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