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If You're Hurt Over Breastfeeding Pics, This Mom Has Something to Tell You

Yes, breastfeeding can be lovely, wonderful and intimate, but let's be real—it can also be a bitch. And just because you don't see tons of pictures of the dark side of breastfeeding on social media, that doesn't mean it doesn't exist. And that's exactly what first-time mom Linda Garcia wants you to know.

When Garcia first saw a post on social media of a mom who had decided to stop breastfeeding, she didn't think much of it. But then she read the comments, and one comment in particular shook her "to the core." So much so that she couldn't stop thinking about it.

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The commenter stated that "she hated pictures of breastfeeding moms that made it look so effortless," which made Garcia realize that her own Facebook timeline was filled with these types of nursing photos—but that definitely didn't mean her breastfeeding journey was easy.

In a Facebook post that's going viral, Garcia shares that she feels she should apologize for not posting realistic pictures of something that many moms struggle with.

Some of those non-photographed moments for Garcia include her bleeding, cracked nipples dripping blood all over her son's face, excruciatingly painful nursing sessions that made her weep and all of the endless cluster feedings throughout all hours of the day and night while "watching his father snore at 3 in the morning." There's also that time she was so sleep-deprived she seriously considered asking her husband for psychiatric help.

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"I should have time-lapsed the endless hours of sacrifice, dedication and hard work it took to get to this point because you only see me in all my breastfeeding glory. I'm sorry momma but I promise you one thing, there was no effortless road taken on my way here," writes Garcia.

She hopes that with her post the entire process of breastfeeding can be normalized—and celebrated—the good, the bad and the ugly.

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