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Dad's Live TV Interview Gets Real When His Kids Show Up

Photograph by BBC

Well, it happened. There’s finally been a sighting of the dadus interuptus in the wild! A professor named Robert E. Kelly has achieved viral status thanks to the sudden appearance of his kids in his office during a live interview with BBC News.

First his toddler appears, dancing in like she’s ready to get the party started, followed quickly by the baby scooting into the room in a walker on wheels like he owns the place. Finally, bringing up the rear is a frantic mom or nanny or do-gooder passing by, who snags the kids and hightails it out of the room.

It’s all over in a matter of seconds. Lucky for all of us, it can be watched over and over and over again.

If you laughed, welcome to the club.

The video is hysterical, not least because that little girl has some serious sass in her dance, and that baby has got some serious zoom on those wheels.

But let’s get serious for a second, shall we?

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Would everyone be laughing if this were a working mom professor interrupted while giving an interview with a global news outlet? Or would we be treated to dozens of thinkpieces on the reasons women can’t do it all, the inappropriate nature of including children in the workplace (yes, we realize this is the Kelleys’ home, but it was clearly an office setting) and some particularly snide responses from a few über right-wingers who think women should just give up and stay home to keep control of those infernal brats?

Laughter is the appropriate response to a video like this. Laughter in the “Oh man, we’ve all been there” sense, that is, not judgmental laughter (although surely there was some of that, too). The kids were cute. No harm was done. And we should all move along after watching a few dozen times.

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Which is what will likely happen, of course, because Kelley is a dad. And we all know when dads and kids mix in the workplace, things end up ship-shape in the end. Dads get giant pats on the back for co-parenting and load-sharing and a string of other buzzwords designed to congratulate good dads for doing what their more neanderthal brethren won’t: acting like parents.

Good dads should be treated kindly.

But then, so should every parent. It’s a tough job, it's true. We’re all just doing what we can.

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