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These Popular Baby Names by State Are Ones You've Never Heard Of

Photograph by Twenty20

Once a cousin, neighbor or BFF claims the biggie baby names—Sophia for girls, Jackson for boys—what's left for the rest of us?

Well, that all depends on where you are. Regionalism is alive and well in the U.S. and where you live apparently greatly influences what you name your kids.

Time magazine crunched the data to figure out the most popular uncommon baby names by state. Uncommon in that they weren't nationally popular. Most popular because there are many more than one in the state.

Which is how we get these girl/boy top names: Kadence and Cornelius (Alabama), Jazlyn and Augustine (Colorado) and the bafflingly popular (it's cute and all, but No. 1?) Raylynn and Memphis (Kentucky).

Memphis isn't even in Kentucky!

In Indiana, the No. 1 uncommong girl's name is Lincoln. In Wisconsin, the most popular for boys is Jordy.

Kansas brings you multiple Haydens and Daytons. Oklahoma likes a classroom with at least one Spencer and Baker. In Missouri, you'll see toy license plates with Letty and Brett emblazoned on them.

Time magazine explains the absence of Noahs and Kates, Aidens and Isabelles on these lists, saying the most popular baby name across the country tends to be evenly distributed around the nation but it's the also-rans that get super regional. They set out to create the list that includes South Carolina naming a lot girls and boys Charleston and Coleman, and Tennessee building families of Briley and Deangelo.

They used the same data from the Social Security Administration that determines the top name each year. But sometimes they had to dig down to get away from Emma, Kevin, Ava and Lucas. So, for example, South Dakota's most uncommon popular baby name for girls is Berkely, which ranked 75th overall in the state. In neighboring Nebraska, where Berkley ranked 234th, the girl/boy names on this unusual list were Rory and Barrett.

Time has a handy chart for all the states. But if, in 5 years, a new kid named Clifford shows up in your child's kindergarten class, know that he was probably born in Ohio.

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