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Mom Demands Son Be Treated by a 'White Doctor'

Photograph by Twenty20

It's understandable to want the best medical care for your kid. But for one outraged mom caught on camera, it seems the only qualification she cares about is the color of the doctor's skin.

The four-minute video, recorded by Hitesh Bhardwaj, one of the people in the waiting room, shows a mom asking Rapid Access to Medical Specialists clinic staff in Mississauga (in Ontario, Canada) multiple times for a "white doctor" to treat her son's chest pains.

"I saw a doctor that was not white that did not help my kid,” the woman says in the video. “I would like to see a white doctor. You’re telling me there isn’t one white doctor in this whole entire building?”

At one point, she even says, "Being white in this country, I should just shoot myself."

She continues to ask repeatedly for a "white doctor" who "doesn't have brown teeth" and "speaks English." (Because apparently only white people can speak English and have non-brown teeth.)

Some people in the waiting room call the mom out for being racist. A few try to get her to go to the hospital, but she responds, "I was there and they only have brown doctors."

One woman even tells her, "Your child clearly has more issues of you being his mother than needing to see a doctor. You are extremely rude and racist."

During this heated exchange, the mom accuses the witnesses of "attacking me because I'm white."

Police were called to the clinic for a "disturbance," and the woman's son was treated by a doctor at the clinic. No charges were made.

Bhardwaj, who immigrated to Canada five years ago, can't believe what he saw.

"I couldn't help but record the video. This is bad, this is inappropriate and shouldn't go unnoticed," he tells CBC. "I couldn't stop thinking about it. The whole episode kept on repeating in my head, I was very upset. You know I can't even define the feeling."

Unfortunately, the mom's demands for a white doctor isn't an isolated case.

"A lot of physicians who are visible minorities or have accents that suggest that they're immigrants, they face this. They face incidents like this," Dr. Nadia Alam, who has also faced similar discrimination, tells CBC Toronto. "I've seen it through medical school, I've seen it through residency, I've seen it on and off through my practice."

Now that you know what not to ask when finding medical care for your child, here are 10 questions that are actually health-related to ask instead.

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